Thursday February 14, 2019

Our rouute, and tentative timing, is based on personal conversations, Jimmy Cornell’s book “world sailing routes,” sv Soggy Pays, and Noonsite. All distances need to be confirmed.

I realize things change. As they say, men make plans, Neptune laughs.

With that being said, here goes (Rendition 1):

 

New Zealand to Noumea New Caledonia (915 nm / 9 days)
(depart April 30 / arrive May 8)

 

New Caledonia to Port Moresby Papua New Guinea (1349 nm / 13 days)
(depart May 15 / arrive May 27)

 

Papua New Guinea to Indonesia (930 – 1650 nm / 9 – 16 days)
(depart June 27 / arrive July 5. – 12)

 

Indonesia to Cocos Keeling (about 1150 nm / 11 days)
(depart August 5 – 12 / arrive August 22)

 

Cocos to Mauritius (2350 nm / 21 days)
(depart September 1 / arrive September 22)

 

Mauritius to Reunion (142 nm / 2 days)

 

Mauritius – Reunion – Richards Bay (South Africa) – (1576nm / 16 days)
(depart October 23 / arrive November 7

 

Richards Bay to Durban to Cape Town via East London, Port Elizabeth and Mossel Bay (802 nm / 20 days)
(depart November 8 / arrive November 28)

 

Considerations.

Plan based on 100 nm per day

New Caledonia is expensive. 1 week there is fine.

Papua New Guinea and Indonesia both have a 30 day visa waiver program.

Best time to sail Cocos to Mauritius is September, Best time to sail Durban to Cape Town in Late December. Go figure?

 

BTW, Sandy Island (sometimes labelled in French Île de Sable, and in Spanish Isla Arenosa) is a non-existent island that was charted for over a century as being located near the French territory of New Caledonia between the Chesterfield Islands and Nereus Reef in the eastern Coral Sea. The island was included on many maps and nautical charts from as early as the late 19th century. It was removed from French hydrographic charts in 1974. The island gained wide media and public attention in November 2012 when the R/V Southern Surveyor, an Australian research ship, passed through the area and “undiscovered” it. The island was quickly removed from many maps and data sets, including those of the National Geographic Society and Google Maps.


Day sail lunch in New Zealand


The Route